March 19, 2003
MEDIA CONTACT: John Lazarou
PHONE: 410-502-8902
E-MAIL: jlazaro1@jhmi.edu

Sports Medicine News Tips  

Listed below are story ideas from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine's Division of Sports Medicine. To pursue any of these stories, contact John M. Lazarou, 410-502-8902 or jlazaro1@jhmi.edu

COLLEGE BASKETBALL PLAYERS' OTHER OPPONENT: ACL INJURIES
The upcoming "March Madness" tournament will bring us college basketball players at the top of their game: thirty-nine two-hour games filled with running, leaping, pivoting and stopping on a dime, all of which stress the joints of even the best-conditioned basketball players. One of the most serious injuries they face is tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), the tissue that stabilizes the knee and allows basketball players to make those acrobatic swoops. It can tear without warning, even during a move an athlete has done thousands of times. Edward G. McFarland, M.D., director of sports medicine and shoulder surgery at Johns Hopkins can offer insight and training tips that reduce the risk of this and other knee injuries. According to recent statistics issued by the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, each year more than 100,000 ACL repairs are performed on an inpatient and outpatient basis in the United States. The majority of injuries are among athletes 15 to 25 years old, and about 70 percent of these injuries occur in non-contact situations.

HEY, WEEKEND WARRIORS: "PAY ATTENTION TO YOUR PAIN!"
While there may be no fountain of youth, you can slow down the aging process by staying physically active. Registration for recreational softball, baseball, basketball and other sports leagues, are in full gear as warm weather months approach. But once the activity starts, amateur or occasional athletes may ignore warning signs of injuries that need quick attention. While some sports injuries are immediately evident, others can creep up slowly and progressively get worse. Edward G. McFarland, M.D., can explain the difference between "good or bad" pain following strenuous activity, and what to do when pain starts.

HOW TO PREVENT INJURIES ON THE GREENS
People often consider golf a safe, low-level physical activity unlikely to cause serious injury. They are mostly right, but golfers are not immune. Leading the list of injuries are golfer's elbow and low back pain, both of which can be caused by a poor swing. Brian J. Krabak, M.D., assistant professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation and assistant professor of orthopedic surgery at Johns Hopkins is an expert on what treatments, medical and surgical, are available to avoid or limit elbow and back problems. He can also offer some simple techniques and conditioning tips that may help your game and make you healthier in the long run.

Related Web site:
http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/orthopedicsurgery/sports


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