NATIONAL RESIDENT MATCHING PROGRAM DAY

March 19, 1996
Media Contact:Joann Rodgers
Phone: (410) 955-8659
E-mail:jrodgers@welchlink.welch.jhu.edu plandis@welchlink.welch.jhu.edu

The 120 Johns Hopkins School of Medicine seniors will learn at noon tomorrow in Turner Auditorium which residency program they will enter to continue their medical training.

Hopkins students are among more than 14,000 U.S. medical school seniors participating in the National Resident Matching Program, through which almost all graduates secure residency positions. All learn simultaneously which hospitals agree to the "match" the students requested. Last month, students ranked their desired locations and specialties, and hospitals ranked their requirements. Computers make the matches. Historically, Hopkins students usually get their first or second choices.

Following a national trend, the number of students looking to train in some specialities continues to decline. For instance, a decreasing number of Hopkins students are requesting radiology residencies and an increasing number are requesting residencies in internal medicine, pediatrics and family medicine, said H. Franklin Herlong, M.D., associate dean for students and associate professor of medicine. Sixty-five percent of the Hopkins senior class will be in primary care residencies. "This is, in part, due to the increasing demand for primary care phsyicians," Herlong said.

Nationally, of the 14,539 U.S. medical seniors participating in this year's Match, 54.4 percent will enter residency training in one of the generalist disciplines, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges, the manager of the Match program:

2,276 U.S. seniors will enter family practice residencies, a 9.4 percent increase from last year; and,

3,419 U.S. seniors will enter internal medicine residencies, a 2.8 percent increase over last year.

Likewise, the decline nationally in some specialties has been significant:

Only 43 U.S. seniors will enter first-year anesthesiology residencies this year, a 53.8 percent drop from last year;

243 U.S. seniors will enter diagnostic radiology residency programs, a 26.6 percent drop.


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