FRALIC HEADS HOPKINS NURSING

March 8, 1994
Media Contact:>Joann Rodgers
Phone: (410) 955-8659
E-mail:
JRodgers@welchlink.welch.jhu.edu

Maryann F. Fralic, R.N, Dr.P.H., FAAN, has been named vice president for nursing at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. A national and international consultant author and lecturer in health care and nursing administration. Fralic is Hopkins' ninth chief nursing officer in its 104-year history.

Before joining Hopkins, she was senior vice president of nursing at the Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick, NJ., and clinical associate dean at Rutgers University College of Nursing.

At Hopkins, Fralic becomes the corporate representative for all professional nurses and interprets nursing issues for the entire institution.

"Nursing practice is like the hub in a wheel. The spokes are education, research, technology and the managers and the theorists who support the hub," she says. "My goal is to help them all work together so the wheel turns smoothly."

Fralic's background reflects a wide range of nursing roles. She started as a clinical nurse in medicine and surgery at McKeesport Hospital near Pittsburgh, PA. Her administrative career began as a supervisor there, and later she became the chief nursing officer at Braddock General Hospital. Her teaching career includes appointments as assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh, adjunct professor at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and New York University. She joined the Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in 1984. Fralic also has led various research initiatives and is widely published on issues of nursing and nursing administration.

She is the recipient of the University of Pittsburgh's first Distinguished Alumni Award, and was elected to fellowship in the American Academy of Nursing in 1990 and currently is a fellow in the Johnson & Johnson -- Wharton Program in Management for Nurses.


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